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November 2001, Volume 8, Number 11

THE AMERICAS

Preventing Terrorism
The combination of an economic downturn and the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack has altered the US immigration debate. Before the attacks, the

Census: Eight Million Unauthorized
The Census Bureau estimated that there were seven to eight million foreigners living without authorization in the US in 2000, up from 3.5 million in

Labor: Unemployment
The US unemployment rate was unchanged at 4.9 percent in September 2001. However, the survey was taken during the week of September 11, 2001, and

Canada: New Legislation
Immigration Minister Elinor Caplan said that the September 11 attacks on New York and Washington would not change Canada's immigration and refugee

Mexico: Remittances, Economy
President Vicente Fox said that Mexico would help the United States in its fight against terrorism by providing intelligence information, maintaining

Latin America
Caribbean. The Caribbean Hotel Association, whose members account for 110,000 rooms in 35 nations, reported that only half as many tourists as

ASIA

China: WTO, Jobs, Migration
China will join the World Trade Organization in 2002. Duties on imported farm produce are to be lowered from 22 percent in 2001 to 17 percent over

Japan: Brazilians
As the number of foreigners living in Japan increases, local governments are experimenting with ways to provide information and services to them.

Southeast Asia
Thailand. Thailand's third major registration exercise ended October 23, 2001. Employers registered 559,541 of the estimated 816,000 illegal

Korea: Crackdown
Seoul prosecutors announced in October 2001 that they had arrested 46 labor brokers who brought 300 foreigners, mostly Chinese, into Korea for six to

 
EUROPE

EU: Terrorism, Harmonization
Before September 11, most EU members were expected to follow the recommendation of the EU Commission and liberalize immigration policy. Germany and

Germany, Austria
Social Democratic Party (SPD) Interior Minister Otto Schily presented a draft immigration law to the Cabinet on September 26, 2001 despite opposition

UK, Ireland
Home Secretary David Blunkett proposed a package of anti-terrorism laws that would make it a criminal offense to train or provide goods and services

France: Suburbs
France's suburbs, home to many North Africans and their children, were reportedly tense in October 2001, reflecting the French government's support

Eastern Europe, Russia
Poland. PriceWaterhouseCoopers (PWC) did a poll for the British-based MORI center that found 40 percent of Polish respondents were interested

Italy: 1.7 Million Foreigners
Caritas reported that there were 1.7 million foreigners living legally in Italy, with 25 percent from Eastern Europe, followed by North Africans.

OTHER

Australia: Asylum Seekers
Australia is headed for elections on November 10, 2001, with 150 seats in the House of Representatives and half the 76 Senate seats being contested.

Middle East: Renationalization
Most of the oil-exporting countries in the Gulf region have more foreign than citizen residents, and 50 to 90 percent of private-sector workers are

South Asia
Afghanistan. The US-led bombing of Afghanistan was expected to produce a new exodus of Afghan refugees. However, after a week of bombing,

Africa: Migrants
South Africa. On October 22, 2001, a mob of South Africans chased Zimbabweans out of a squatter settlement near Johannesburg and then torched

Demography, Slavery
The world's population rose from 1.6 billion in 1900 to six billion in 2000. Average life expectancy at birth more than doubled between 1900 and