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July 2012 Volume 18 Number 3

Managing the Dynamic S&E Labor Market

JULY 12-13, 2012

Institute for the Study of International Migration
Georgetown University, Washington D.C.
and the UC Comparative Immigration & Integration Program, UCD
Supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Conference report

ROUNDTABLE AGENDA

The Science and Engineering workforce is, arguably, the backbone of a modern information-age economy, prompting a global competition for S&E workers. Unsurprisingly, controversy surrounds S&E workforce issues, raising questions such as how many domestic workers are available and how many immigrants should be admitted? Today’s methods of setting numbers for immigrant admissions are ad hoc and inflexible. What approaches should the United States consider in pending immigration reforms?

THURSDAY JULY 12th
RIGGS LIBRARY, HEALY HALL ON MAIN GEORGETOWN CAMPUS

8:00-8:45
CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
8:45-9:00
INTRODUCTIONS
9:00 –10:30
THE SUPPLY PIPELINE AND THE DEMAND FOR S&E WORKERS
How robust is the supply of domestic students and workers? How will tomorrow’s demographics affect the outlook?
Chair: B. Lindsay Lowell, Georgetown University
Hal Salzman, Rutgers University
Anthony P. Carnevale, Georgetown University
10:45–12:15
INNOVATION BOOSTERS OR THE DEATH OF SUPPLY & DEMAND
Many stakeholders either implicitly or explicitly dismiss concern about a possible over-supply of S&E workers, since and especially immigrant S&E workers are believed to spur innovation and create jobs. Do they? How many innovations and jobs?
Chair: Michael Teitelbaum, Wertheim Fellow, Harvard Law School
Mark Regets, National Science Foundation (NCSES/NSF)
David Hart, George Mason University
12:15-1:30
LUNCH (ON SITE)
1:30-3:00
MANAGEMENT BY SMART REGULATION
Regulations shape the supply of immigrants; say testing the market with attestations compared with certification. Are Singapore’s high wage requirements a better alternative? What about pre-screening employers and workers?
Chair: Pia Orrenius, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas
Barry Chiswick, George Washington University
Francis Cissna, Director, Immigration Policy, DHS
David North, Center for Immigration Studies
3:15-5:00
MANAGEMENT BY INDICATORS OR MARKETS
Wage and employment growth are among the top-down indicators that can be used to determine if there are labor shortages. How viable are such top-down indicators? What are the alternatives, including auctioning of visas?
Chair: B. Lindsay Lowell, Georgetown University
Phil Martin, University of California at Davis
Pia Orrenius, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas
Burt Barnow, George Washington University
5:15
COCKTAILS (ON SITE)
6:30
DINNER (Mai Thai Restaurant)

FRIDAY JULY 13th
HARRIS BUILDING, NORTH GEORGETOWN OFF WISCONSIN

8:00-9:00
CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
9:00-10:30
MANAGEMENT BY COMMISSION
The notion of a Commission that sets admission numbers is not new, but it has gotten a lot of currency in the past few years. What should a Commission look like? What facts would it consider? How would it interact with Congress?
Chair, Phil Martin, University of California at Davis
Ross Eisenbrey, Economic Policy Institute
Madeleine Sumption, Migration Policy Institute
10:45-12:15
CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS
The final session is a forum for an open discussion of the issues discussed during the day. What is the play of supply and demand in today’s and tomorrow’s S&E workforce? What means offer the best opportunities for better regulation of immigrant admissions?
Chair: B. Lindsay Lowell, Georgetown University
Michael Teitelbaum, Wertheim Fellow, Harvard Law School
Bruce A. Morrison, Morrison Public Affairs Group (MPAG) Phil Martin, University of California at Davis



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